817-377-8598
Call Now:
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Copyright © 2019. Atlas Rug Gallery
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Roadrunner Media  Website Design
China has a long tradition of carpet production which dates at over 2.000 years and were initially used in the imperial courts. The art of knotting carpets was however, introduced somewhere around the 15th to 17th century in China. The patterns on some of the older Chinese carpets are often taken from the patterns of the porcelain painters and silk designs. In some cases the patterns also show old religious symbols with distinguished dragon patterns. The symbols in these carpets occasionally have taostic or buddhistic origins. Thin warp threads of cotton can often be found in the elderly carpets, which together with rough pile yarn gives large knots and carpets that are fairly thick, but also soft and flexible. These carpets are manufactured in the provinces of Kansu, Ningxia, Suiyan and in Inner Mongolia near the city of Baotou (Baotou carpets, often in small sizes, characterized by landscape and symbolic motifs with blue in different nuances as a dominating colours). Later on Shansi-, Hopei- and Shantung provinces were added as some of the manufacturing provinces

Chinese Persian Design

Since as early as 1696 in the area around Ningxia, Chinese weavers have been creating beautiful rug masterpieces. By the 1860′s there were workshops in Beijing making rugs for the imperial court. From art deco to delicate floral spray creations, Chinese rug patterns are some of the most varied in the world. By the late 1980′s, finely woven Persian rugs with intricate floral patterns began to replace simpler designs in popularity. We have selected several of these latter masterpieces for viewing here at Atlas Rug.
Categories
817-377-8598
Call Now:
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Copyright © 2016. Atlas Rug Gallery
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Roadrunner Media  Website Design
China has a long tradition of carpet production which dates at over 2.000 years and were initially used in the imperial courts. The art of knotting carpets was however, introduced somewhere around the 15th to 17th century in China. The patterns on some of the older Chinese carpets are often taken from the patterns of the porcelain painters and silk designs. In some cases the patterns also show old religious symbols with distinguished dragon patterns. The symbols in these carpets occasionally have taostic or buddhistic origins. Thin warp threads of cotton can often be found in the elderly carpets, which together with rough pile yarn gives large knots and carpets that are fairly thick, but also soft and flexible. These carpets are manufactured in the provinces of Kansu, Ningxia, Suiyan and in Inner Mongolia near the city of Baotou (Baotou carpets, often in small sizes, characterized by landscape and symbolic motifs with blue in different nuances as a dominating colours). Later on Shansi-, Hopei- and Shantung provinces were added as some of the manufacturing provinces

Chinese Persian Design

Since as early as 1696 in the area around Ningxia, Chinese weavers have been creating beautiful rug masterpieces. By the 1860′s there were workshops in Beijing making rugs for the imperial court. From art deco to delicate floral spray creations, Chinese rug patterns are some of the most varied in the world. By the late 1980′s, finely woven Persian rugs with intricate floral patterns began to replace simpler designs in popularity. We have selected several of these latter masterpieces for viewing here at Atlas Rug.
Categories
817-377-8598
Call Now:
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Copyright © 2016. Atlas Rug Gallery
4915 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, Texas 76107 (Next to Kincaid’s Hamburger)
Since 1986
Roadrunner Media  Website Design
China has a long tradition of carpet production which dates at over 2.000 years and were initially used in the imperial courts. The art of knotting carpets was however, introduced somewhere around the 15th to 17th century in China. The patterns on some of the older Chinese carpets are often taken from the patterns of the porcelain painters and silk designs. In some cases the patterns also show old religious symbols with distinguished dragon patterns. The symbols in these carpets occasionally have taostic or buddhistic origins. Thin warp threads of cotton can often be found in the elderly carpets, which together with rough pile yarn gives large knots and carpets that are fairly thick, but also soft and flexible. These carpets are manufactured in the provinces of Kansu, Ningxia, Suiyan and in Inner Mongolia near the city of Baotou (Baotou carpets, often in small sizes, characterized by landscape and symbolic motifs with blue in different nuances as a dominating colours). Later on Shansi-, Hopei- and Shantung provinces were added as some of the manufacturing provinces

Chinese Persian

Design

Since as early as 1696 in the area around Ningxia, Chinese weavers have been creating beautiful rug masterpieces. By the 1860′s there were workshops in Beijing making rugs for the imperial court. From art deco to delicate floral spray creations, Chinese rug patterns are some of the most varied in the world. By the late 1980′s, finely woven Persian rugs with intricate floral patterns began to replace simpler designs in popularity. We have selected several of these latter masterpieces for viewing here at Atlas Rug.
Categories